end kvetch

Macs, productivity, &c.

The Confessions of a Firefox Convert

As I mentioned earlier, I’ve recently transitioned from being an ardent Safari fan to using Firefox. While the plugin-ability of Firefox is certainly nice (even if many individual plugins are rather clunky), that’s not the reason I switched. As I also mentioned before, I was experiencing an extremely obnoxious text entry bug in Safari (on the bright side, it taught me a lot of ways to get rid of text without the delete key) and I figured it was time to get away from it.

The Transition

import1I was kind of dreading having to manually bring all my Safari bookmarks across to Firefox. However, Firefox offers a handy little import wizard that allows you to bring just about all your data from Safari (or another browser) into Firefox. While it worked as advertised, I was left with the bookmarks in Firefox in addition to the ones that were imported from Safari. While deleting the duplicates wasn’t as much work as entering them all manually, the transition still could have used some smoothing out.

Even with 1Password integration, most credentials need to be reentered for the new browser, but I suppose that’s to be expected, and it’s not a terrible pain.

The Interface

Obviously, I’m a pretty big interface junkie: The AHIG is practically my bible, and I like all my applications’ interfaces to be as coordinated as possible. Since it was developed by Apple, Safari is pretty clearly on the top of the heap as far as interface matching with the rest of the OS goes. While Firefox 3’s interface is a massive improvement over its predecessor, there are still some elements that don’t sit too well with me.

favicons

Firefox relies pretty heavily on favicons: They show up in the address bar, the search bars, the tabs. Now, on a conceptual level, I have no problem with this; favicons are a nice visual aid to navigation. However, the realty is, most favicons are pretty ugly and I would rather not have to stare at them constantly. I’m also something of an interface minimalist, and since I can get on just fine without favicons, I prefer the cleaner look you get without them. Also, considering how much time I have to spend looking at them, I wish Mozilla would provide something other than an ugly document icon for the blank favicon.

spelling-ffx

It’s a minor issue, but Firefox’s non-standard contextual menu also bugs me. I’m willing to look past the squared edges and such, but what really gets to me (since it’s what I use the contextual menu for most often) is the spell checking– it just looks so much worse than the layout the rest of the system uses.

Once you consider plugins, many of which are pretty disastrous interface-wise, Firefox can be something of a visual train-wreck on a Mac (and believe me, themes don’t help).

Performance

One of the main reasons I’ve been so resistant to Firefox is its speed: I’ve always thought it was a slowpoke compared to Safari. While I’m pretty sure the benchmarks still indicate that Safari is snappier, I haven’t been noticing much of a difference in my everyday browsing. When it comes to load speeds, it seems like the two browsers are pretty evenly matched.

Features

Admittedly, Safari does not have a whole lot that Firefox lacks in terms of features. Off the top of my head, I think the ability to resize text boxes is the only thing which Safari has and Firefox doesn’t.

With a plethora of plugins available, Firefox is pretty much set for features. While it would be nicer if it had things like private browsing and easy user agent switching out of the “box”, installing plugins is easy enough that I don’t really mind.

picture-2

Ad blocking, one of my favorite features in any browser, is really quite impressive in Firefox thanks to the Adblock Plus plugin. While AdBlock for Safari is very unobtrusive and does the job 90% of the time, Adblock Plus, while slightly more obtrusive, offers more effective, fine-grained control.

Conclusion

Firefox is a nice browser, sure, it wouldn’t be gaining users like crazy if it wasn’t. It has great features, especially with extensive plugin-ability, and although the interface isn’t everything it could be, Firefox is just as fine a browser for OS X as Safari is. That said, if that pesky text entry bug were to resolve itself, I’d be back to Safari in a jiffy. Some things just feel right.

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Filed under: Apple, , , ,

4 Responses

  1. Asa Dotzler says:

    Firefox 3.1 will fix a couple of your gripes. Context menus, for example, are super-slick now. You can try it here http://stage.mozilla.org/pub/mozilla.org/firefox/nightly/latest-mozilla-1.9.1/firefox-3.1b3pre.en-US.mac.dmg (link to latest nightly build.)

    – A

  2. fussball says:

    Gute Arbeit hier! Gute Inhalte.

  3. gesundheit says:

    Sehr wertvolle Informationen! Empfehlen!

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